Former Giants pitcher Kasahara admits to betting: report | Reuters

($1 = 101.3600 yen)

The NPB which prohibits professional players from betting on games, handed a one-year ban on another Giants pitcher Kyosuke Takagi for illegal betting in March.

(Reporting by Nivedita Shankar in Bengaluru; Editing by Amlan Chakraborty)

Former Yomiuri Giants pitcher Shoki Kasahara has admitted to his involvement in illegal gambling at a hearing held at the Tokyo District Court on Monday, Kyodo news agency reported.

The 25-year-old was suspended by Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB), the country’s professional baseball governing body, in November for illegally betting on games, which included Major League Baseball and Japanese high school games.

Kasahara is said to have aided a former restaurant operator’s betting scheme by collecting money from two other former Giants players, and gambled a total of 1.2 million yen ($11,838.99) himself between September 2014 and August 2015, the report said. Click for more

Don’t Be a Square: 10 Tips for Betting on Football

Focus on Conferences – “The best way to win money betting football is to develop a niche and follow it closely,” Moseman advises. Consider Underdogs – “In the long-run, it’s easier to win betting on the underdog,” Konik says. On college you will be able to find different lines at different sports books. The NFL, for example, will have very similar numbers at most of the betting shops you visit. Shop For Numbers – “Another important aspect of betting on football is shopping for the best number,” Moseman explains.

10.

1. If you want advice about sports betting, find someone who has a successful track record.

4. Chasing losses is the fastest way to the poor house.”

Ted Sevransky, a well-known Las Vegas gambler and sports consultant with Sportsmemo.com, agrees.

6. “If you listen to their advice, you are sure to lose. He loses year after year, according to Dan Gordon, a top football handicapper and author of How to Beat the Sports Books (Cardoza Publishing 2005). “In trying to bamboozle potential customers, many services make claims about having scouts all over the country that give them inside information and promise 70 or even 80 percent winners, as if the bookmakers were the biggest suckers in the world. The only locks that exist are those that need keys to open them.”

Although exact figures are impossible to calculate, according to Jimmy Vaccaro, widely considered to be Las Vegas’ most influential bookmaker, Americans probably wager more than $50 billion a year on NFL and college football combined. They use powerful computers that can process millions of bits of data and produce a more accurate point-spread line than the bookmakers.”

“A square is the average, unsophisticated gambler whose decision making is based on hunches, media manipulation, or spurious systems that cannot overcome the bookmaker’s inherent mathematical advantage,” Konik explains. “Over the course of several seasons, the percentage of bettors who turn a profit is minuscule.”

9. Money Management – “This is without a doubt the most important aspect of betting on sports and possibly the most neglected,” says Morey “Doc” Moseman, a professional gambler and sports consultant with DocSports.com for nearly 40 years.

Another difference between squares and sharps is how they approach betting on game day.

8. “There will be more discrepancy in the numbers at different sports books. So underdogs tend to be slightly undervalued – except by the sharps.”

So, how much should you bet a game?

“A sharp or smart has a plan of what he wants to do,” says Vaccaro, the director of sports operations and public relations at Lucky’s Race and Sports Book in Las Vegas. “Thus, the bookies love and cherish the squares.”

3. There is a wealth of information on the Internet; it is just up to you to find it and research it daily.”

“In an average season, fewer than one bettor in twelve turns a profit,” Gordon says. He is not taken in by being involved in USC-Notre Dame just because it is the biggest watched game of the day. Otherwise, you’re better off doing your own research.”

But that doesn’t mean you have to bet like a “square” and throw away your hard-earned money.

Also, it’s probably a good idea to disregard advice from the myriad of ex-players and football experts you see on television each week. Not all games work according to this formula, but it is usually a good rule of thumb.”

Certainly not back into the pockets of the average bettor. “Teams play inspired ball at home. If North Texas is his best bet on a Saturday then that is his bet.

“Most people with an understanding of football gambling bet between 3 percent and 5 percent of their bankroll, increasing when they win and reducing when they lose,” Vaccaro says.

Betting on football games; whether it’s through a local bookie, an offshore Internet site or a Nevada casino (still the only legal place in America to make football bets), most of us have done it or know of someone who has. These books change their numbers according to the betting patterns of their customers, so it is not entirely uncommon to find two or three point differences in the lines.”

“The bookies fear and despise a tiny coterie of professional bettors known as ‘the sharps,’” Konik says. “If you become an expert on a smaller conference like the WAC, you have a good chance to beat the house because sports book operators do not have the time or resources to follow this conference the way you can. “For example, if you have a $1,000 bankroll for the season, you should generally bet no more than $50 a game.”

“The biggest mistake that amateur bettors make is they increase their bets when they are losing,” Sevransky says. If you are going to go with a favorite, it is best to place your bet early in the week when the sharps are laying heavy money on the points.

Michael Konik, a sports writer and best-selling author of The Smart Money (Simon & Schuster 2006), explains why it is so hard for the recreational gambler to win at betting on football. Locks Don’t Exist – “Anyone who has watched sports for about a month realizes that the difference between winning and losing, especially against the spread, can be infinitesimally small,” Gordon says. “As for me, the best bet in football is betting the point spread or over/under totals on individual games. “In the NFL, a game will often be totally turned around by one or two plays, or even a single penalty. Giving 11 to 10 odds is almost always the cheapest price you can give.”

“The talking heads on TV know nothing about sports betting,” says Sevransky. Oakland comes to mind) seem like the Super Bowl.

Even Hollywood is not immune – think Two for the Money with Al Pacino and Matthew McConaughey.

5. “Common wisdom says that over the course of a long football season the average man Click for more

Entries in long-hidden notebook show Pete Rose bet on baseball as player

There was a for sale sign out front, the agent told him. Postal Inspection Service in October 1989, nearly two months after Rose was declared permanently ineligible by Major League Baseball. He placed his financial interest ahead of the Reds, period.”

o Most bets, regardless of sport, were about $2,000. The largest single bet was $5,500 on the Boston Celtics, a bet he lost.

When the case began, it didn’t look particularly enticing, Barney said. After Bertolini pleaded guilty and received a federal prison sentence, Sports Illustrated, The New York Times, ESPN and other news organizations filed freedom of information requests with the U.S. Dowd and his team had sworn testimony from bookie Ron Peters that Rose bet on the Reds from 1984 through 1986, but not written documentation. There was stuff everywhere,” Barney said.

“It was a mere ‘failure to render [services]‘ complaint,” said Barney, who is now retired. It’s another device by Pete to try to excuse what he did,” Dowd said. And that is a very powerful problem,” Dowd said. The man’s name was Michael Bertolini, and the business he ran out of his home was called Hit King Marketing Inc.

Yes, he admitted in 2004, after almost 15 years of denials, he had placed bets on baseball, but he insisted it was only as a manager.

In April, Outside the Lines examined the Bertolini memorabilia kept in the National Archives’ New York office, but the betting book — held apart from everything else — was off-limits. “This is the final piece of the puzzle on a New York betting operation with organized crime. They took any records I had whatsoever, and they took different personal belongings and memorabilia from my home.”

The documents obtained by Outside the Lines, which reflect betting records from March through July 1986, show no evidence that Rose, who was a player-manager in 1986, bet against his team.

Outside the Lines tracked down two of the postal inspectors who conducted the raid on Bertolini’s home in 1989 and asked them to review the documents. Attorney’s Office seeking access to the book. It looked to them as if Bertolini had been signing memorabilia with the forged names of some of the most famous baseball players in history: Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, Duke Snider, Mike Schmidt and Pete Rose. [The mob] had a mortgage on Pete while he was a player and manager.”

“This does it. Attorney’s Office internal memorandum from 2000 that requested the spiral notebook’s transfer said Bertolini’s closed file has “sufficient historical or other value to warrant its continued preservation by the United States Government.” The memorandum listed among its attachments a copy of the notebook, but a copy of the memorandum provided by the National Archives had no attachments and had a section redacted.

“There were numbers and dates and — it was a book for sports betting,” Barney said. District Court in Brooklyn six years later (he served 14 months for tax fraud and a concurrent assault sentence):

But new documents obtained by Outside the Lines indicate Rose bet extensively on baseball — and on the  Cincinnati Reds – as he racked up the last hits of a record-smashing career in 1986. Under MLB Rule 21, “Any player, umpire, or club or league official or employee, who shall bet any sum whatsoever upon any baseball game in connection with which the bettor has a duty to perform shall be declared permanently ineligible.”

o But on 21 of the days it’s clear he bet on baseball, he gambled on the Reds, including on games in which he played.

“He wasn’t forthcoming with much information,” she said, “but he did acknowledge to me it was records of bets he made for Pete Rose.”

“We knew that [Bertolini] recorded the bets, and that he bet himself, but we never had his records. The documents go beyond the evidence presented in the 1989 Dowd report that led to Rose’s banishment and provide the first written record that Rose bet while he was still on the field.

Dowd, who reviewed the documents at Outside the Lines’ request, said his investigators had tried but failed to obtain Bertolini’s records, believing they would be the final piece in their case that Rose was betting with mob-connected bookmakers in New York. “We didn’t know anything about Bertolini or his connection [to Rose].”

In April, Rose repeated his denial, this time on Michael Kay’s ESPN New York 98.7 FM radio show, that he bet on baseball while he was a player. That gave them probable cause to seek a search warrant.

Freelance researcher Liam Quinn contributed to this report. “I was taken aback.”. He refused to give them to us,” Dowd said. On Monday morning, MLB officials declined to comment about the notebook.

Flynn, who said her first reaction was “Holy mackerel,” said they asked Bertolini about the notebook.

The documents are copies of pages from a notebook seized from the home of former Rose associate Michael Bertolini during a raid by the U.S. This closes the door,” said John Dowd, the former federal prosecutor who led MLB’s investigation.

o In the time covered in the notebook, from March through July, Rose bet on at least one MLB team on 30 different days. 13, a few days after the undercover house tour and after obtaining a search warrant, they searched Bertolini’s home and found evidence that would lead to numerous convictions. That came during his worst week of the four-month span, when he lost $25,500.

But Rose’s supporters have based part of their case for his reinstatement on his claim that he never bet while he was a player or against his team, saying that sins he committed as a manager shouldn’t diminish what he did as a player.

“I wish I had been able to use it [the book] all those years he was denying he bet on baseball,” said Flynn, the former postal inspector.

If the accusation was true, it would constitute mail fraud, but the Click for more